John 6:37 All that the Father gives Me will come to Me

John 6:37 All that the Father gives Me will come to Me

All will Come on The Giving Blog by Cheryl Schatz

John 6:37 All that the Father Gives Me

The Promise

Jesus gives an amazing promise in John 6:37~

John 6:37 (NASB) “All that the Father gives Me will come to Me…

Jesus promises all that the Father gives… Let’s start our search into this passage by looking at the terms “all” and “gives.”

All

What does “all” mean in this context?  Does all mean some?  In other words, is Jesus saying that some of what the Father gives Him will come to Him? Not at all.  I think we can safely say from the context because the Father’s will is expressed in the passage, that all simply means all without exception within the group of those who are given.

Gives

Since “all” is that which is given, what is the meaning of the term gives? The grammar will help us to understand. The term “gives” in the Greek is in the present, active, indicative. The present means that the action is in process without an assessment of the action’s completion. Gives as the present tense means that God is presently giving and is continuing to give. Notice that the grammar is not eternity past, but rather the “now.”

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The Bread Given for the life of the World

The Bread Given for the life of the World

Jesus is The Bread on The Giving blog by Cheryl Schatz

The Bread Given

In my last post, I showed how the crowd went from asking Jesus about what they were obligated to do to gain the bread that endures to eternal life, to the next step of asking to see the work that Jesus would do. The purpose of the work is to bring the crowd to faith in Jesus. We stopped in verse 33 where Jesus said that the bread is to give life to the world. Did the crowd understand that they too were a part of the world to whom the bread was given? This post will take apart John 6:34-36.

The request of the crowd

The crowd asked Jesus for the bread which was being offered. There was no sign that the crowd viewed Jesus’ words as exempting them from receiving what He was giving. Their words were clear. Let’s look carefully at the words of the crowd. The crowd said:

John 6:34 (NASB) Then they said to Him, “Lord, always give us this bread.”

Why did the crowd say give “us” this bread? They said these words because they knew what the term “world” meant as Jesus used it in that context. Jesus said that the bread was for “the life of the world.” The use of the term “world” by Jesus was not said in a limited context, and the crowd believed that they could ask for this special bread… so they asked.

John 6:34 (NASB) Then they said to Him, “Lord, always give us this bread.”

By using the term “give” and not “pay”, the crowd understood Jesus to be saying that the bread was something to be granted.
The crowd also said:

John 6:34 (NASB) Then they said to Him, “Lord, always give us this bread.”

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God’s conditions: From doing to seeing in John 6:30-33

God’s conditions: From doing to seeing in John 6:30-33

 From Doing to Seeing on The Giving Blog by Cheryl Schatz

God’s conditions: Who is the doer of the work?

In my last post, I talked about how Jesus showed the unbelieving crowd, who followed Him in John 6, that the “work” which result is meant to bring the crowd to belief, is God’s work. When Jesus shared that it is God’s work, not the work of the crowd, the crowd demanded a work from Jesus.

John 6:30 (NASB) So they said to Him, “What then do You do for a sign, so that we may see, and believe You? What work do You perform?

Notice that the crowd is no longer conversing with Jesus about their own work. Instead, they want a work from Him. They demand “What then do YOU DO…” They understand that there will be a work whose purpose it is to bring them to faith. They now want a work that they can see, a work that is designed to cause them to believe. Jesus rightfully brought the crowd from their mindset about their own righteous works as being the cause of salvation, to the true cause of salvation which is the work of God.

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God’s Work that you believe John 6:28, 29

God’s Work that you believe John 6:28, 29

John 6:28, 29 Believe

What is the Work of God?

In my last post, I discussed the phrase in John 6, which Calvinists ignore from their own proof text passage. In this post, we will deal with John 6:28, 29.

John 6:28–29 (NASB)

28 Therefore they said to Him, “What shall we do, so that we may work the works of God?”

29 Jesus answered and said to them, “This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He has sent.”

When the crowd that had followed Jesus asked Him what they were to do to work the works of God, their question was about their moral or legal obligations before God to gain eternal life. Their question was about works (plural). Their question was also personal. “What work shall we do…?”, they asked.

In reply to the unbelieving crowd, Jesus responded, “this is the work of God” (a singular thing as opposed to plural works). This one (singular) thing is God’s work, in order that you believe in Him (Jesus) whom He (God) has sent.

Who is working?

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The Son of Man WILL give you – John 6:27

The Son of Man WILL give you – John 6:27

Son of Man WILL give

The verse that is the most ignored by Calvinists in their own proof text is John 6:27, and within the verse, in particular, a specific phrase. Calvinists prefer to start their focus in John 6 with verse 37, but it is vital to discuss all of Jesus’ words to the crowd, so that we do not miss out on the truth presented in verse 27.

Jesus makes a promise

In John 6:27 Jesus makes a promise that lays the foundation for the important words that will follow.  Jesus said:

John 6:27 (NASB) “Do not work for the food which perishes, but for the food which endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give to you, for on Him the Father, God, has set His seal.”

To understand this verse, we need to know who Jesus is talking to.

To whom is Jesus talking to?

John 6:26 (NASB) Jesus answered them and said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, you seek Me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate of the loaves and were filled.

Jesus is speaking to the crowd that had been fed by the bread and had followed Jesus. But they were not following Him because they had faith, but because they had a physical need met. Jesus exposes their motive for following Him in verse 26.

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Does Matthew conflict with Luke about Judas?

Does Matthew conflict with Luke about Judas?

The conflict over Judas on The Giving blog by Cheryl Schatz

Does Matthew conflict over Judas?

In my post about Judas and the last supper, Colin Maxwell, a Calvinist responded to my post, although not responding on this blog, but on his twitter account @weeCalvin. He wrote that Luke’s account that listed Judas as being at the first celebration of the covenant in Jesus’ blood should be considered as a disputed passage. He considers Luke disputed not because he doesn’t believe that it is God-breathed, but because he doesn’t believe that it is written in chronological order. He also said that Matthew’s account where Jesus’ words show that Judas could not have been present, should be trusted as the chronological wording of Jesus so that Judas was not offered the wine and the bread representing Jesus’ death on the cross.

Let’s take a look at this issue carefully, trusting that God’s Word does not contradict itself.

How was the book of Luke written?

Let’s look at the testimony of Luke.

Luke 1:1–3 (NASB)

1 Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile an account of the things accomplished among us,

2 just as they were handed down to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and servants of the word,

3 it seemed fitting for me as well, having investigated everything carefully from the beginning, to write it out for you in consecutive order, most excellent Theophilus;

Luke’s purpose was to write out a consecutive, ordered account of the events that happened concerning Jesus and the gospel. That is his testimony.

How was the book of Matthew written?

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All who are drawn come to Jesus? John 6:44

All who are drawn come to Jesus? John 6:44

All Who Come are Drawn John 6:44 by Cheryl SchatzAre all who are drawn also all who come to Jesus?

In my last post, I showed that Scripture must not be taken out of context by making the word “draw” mean “drag” in John 6:44. However, if “draw” does not mean “drag” in John 6, what does “draw” mean within this inspired context? In this post let’s discuss what “draw” means, and whether everyone whom God draws, will eventually come to Jesus?

God’s own Witness

Immediately after Jesus gives the strong statement that no one can come to Him, unless the Father who sent Jesus draws that person, Jesus takes us into the Old Testament to understand the meaning of what He has just said. Let’s examine Jesus’ words very carefully. In John 6:45 Jesus said:

It is written…

These are powerful words. They are the same words that Jesus used to answer challenges from Satan, and from the religious Jews. “It is written” is a powerful appeal to what God has already said!  Who is Jesus answering this time from the context of the “It is written” statement in John 6:45? If we look back at verses 41 and 42, we see the Jews grumbled about Jesus’ claim to be the bread that came down from Heaven. In verse 43 Jesus answered and “said to them” (the grumbling Jews). Jesus tells them not to grumble, and then Jesus gives an amazing revelation to them starting in verse 44.

John 6:44 is Jesus’ response to the grumbling of the Jews

John 6:44 (NASB) “No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him; and I will raise him up on the last day.

Jesus said in John 6:38 that He is the one who had come down from Heaven, but the Jews did not believe Him. Jesus equates “coming” to Him with “believing” in Him. So when the Jews were grumbling against Jesus, they were not believing Him and not coming to Him in faith. Jesus makes it clear that no one can come to Him, no one can believe in Him, unless the Father draws him. Jesus answers the grumbling of the Jews by taking them to what God has already said. Jesus’ statement and His meaning will be confirmed by the witness of Scripture.

A Prophecy answers the Grumblers

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Does God’s drawing mean that He drags people to Himself?

Does God’s drawing mean that He drags people to Himself?

Does Draw mean Drag? by Cheryl Schatz on The Giving blog

God’s drawing: When does “draw” mean “drag”?

If we are to believe Calvinism, we would have to conclude that God is a “dragger.” Calvinists are quick to point out that in John 6:44 the term “draw” actually means “drag” and this is what God does to His elect who, in their unregenerate state, are both unwilling and unable to respond to Him in faith.

Taking the Biblical test

Let’s have a close look at the word “draw” to see what it actually means.

John 6:44 Does God's drawing mean He drags people to Himself? by Cheryl Schatz

If we look up the Greek term for the biblical usage of the word for “draw” we can see that the primary meaning is to “attract.”  There are other meanings for draw when animals, clothing, judgment and mistreatment are the context. For example, the Greek word can mean to “haul” in a net, or to “stretch” a piece of cloth.  

Haul in a net, stretch a garment

It can also mean to drag a person out for the purpose of punishment, mistreatment or judgment:

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Did God hang babies out to dry with the rest of sinning humanity?

Did God hang babies out to dry with the rest of sinning humanity?

Did God hang babies out to dry? by Cheryl Schatz/The Giving DVD blog

My last post on Judas brought up a discussion of Jesus’ words about Judas and what it would have been like for him had he not been born.

Matthew 26:24 (NASB) “The Son of Man is to go, just as it is written of Him; but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been good for that man if he had not been born.”

What is “good”?

There is no doubt that Jesus’ words are inspired. His words are also preserved in the Scripture so that we can learn things that we could not know without His revelation. Jesus gives a conditional statement about what would be “good” or “better” for Judas on the condition that he had died before he was born. Jesus said that for Judas to die before he was born would have been advantageous to Judas. Look at the range of the meanings for the word that Jesus chose to use:

Matthew 26:24 Greek for good on The Giving DVD blog by Cheryl Schatz

What is the specific usage of the Greek word “kalon” in Matthew 26:24?

Let’s consider the specific usage determined by the BDAG lexicon (Bauer, Danker & Arndt) for Matthew 26:24  

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Was Judas predestined to be lost?

Was Judas predestined to be lost?

Judas on The Giving blog by Cheryl Schatz

Is Judas a problem for your theology? He can be a problem if some of your beliefs come from tradition and not from the Scriptures. In this article, I would like to discuss the full Scriptural view of Judas and ask you to test your own understanding against what the Scripture reveals.

What was the history of Judas as one of the Disciples?

Judas was a follower of Jesus who was chosen with eleven others to be Jesus’ apostles.

Luke 6:13 (NASB) And when day came, He called His disciples to Him and chose twelve of them, whom He also named as apostles:

As a disciple of Jesus, he was sent out to preach the gospel of the kingdom and to do miracles.

Matthew 10:5–8 (NASB)

5 These twelve Jesus sent out after instructing them: “Do not go in the way of the Gentiles, and do not enter any city of the Samaritans;

6 but rather go to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.

7 “And as you go, preach, saying, ‘The kingdom of heaven is at hand.’

8 “Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out demons. Freely you received, freely give.

Notice it was the twelve that Jesus sent out and Judas was among the twelve according to Matthew 10:4. Judas was given authority over sickness and the enemy just as the other apostles received. Jesus also said that the twelve were sent out as sheep in the midst of wolves.  

Matthew 10:16 (NASB) “Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves; so be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves.

How did Jesus treat Judas?

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Was John the Baptist predestined to be saved?

Was John the Baptist predestined to be saved?

John the Baptist on The Giving blog by Cheryl Schatz

John the Baptist was he saved as a baby?

In the teaching of Calvinism, there is an election to salvation for some men while the rest of mankind are created without a hope of eternal life. In this understanding God has pre-determined from eternity past that all but the elect would remain in their sin and be lost forever. If Calvinism is true, then there is a portion of mankind that has been unconditionally chosen and guaranteed salvation because Jesus died for their sins and His death and resurrection guarantees their salvation without fail. Unconditional election is either true or false when tested by the Scriptures. May I share my view of the most famous of the elect in the Scriptures?

Was John one of the elect?

If I asked this question of a Calvinist, I am sure that he or she would answer “Yes.” After all, John had the Holy Spirit since he was in his mother’s womb. Jesus even said that John was the greatest so if anyone on earth should be one of the elect, it surely would be John. Let’s have a look at John’s election.

The Bible’s witness of John

Malachi  3:1 names John as God’s messenger:

Malachi 3:1 (NASB) “Behold, I am going to send My messenger, and he will clear the way before Me…

John preached in the wilderness where he drew great crowds. His work as a messenger of the Lord is prophesied in Isaiah:  

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Calvinism’s Challenges and Questions

Calvinism’s Challenges and Questions

Challenges

I would like to collect challenges and questions that Calvinists have for those of us who are non-Calvinists. What question or challenge do you normally give to those Christians who do not believe in the Calvinist “Doctrines of Grace”? I will be going through the comments and questions and composing blog posts to address the challenges. Please don’t forget to read the page “Read this first” so you understand why this blog exists and what I expect from those who post here.

Read this first

Read this first

Welcome to The Giving!  This blog is all about a balanced view of the Sovereignty of God.  I welcome people to post their comments and questions, however, I want my blog to be respectful and gracious towards Christians even those who view the issue of the Sovereignty of God from a different understanding then what is listed on this blog.  Please read my comment policy before you post.

The separation between Calvinism and Arminianism has caused a lot of division in the church at large. It is rare to find public discussions that are civil as there is much name-calling and mocking that substitutes for Christian charity over the issue of the Sovereignty of God. It is my view that we are to treat brothers and sisters in Christ with respect and love as if our Lord was standing in our midst. When Christians mock other Christians because of secondary issues of faith, how will we bring honor to Jesus who died for our brother as well as for us?

My blog will take a non-Calvinist viewpoint, but there will be an opportunity to provide feedback and respectful challenges.

This blog seeks to do two things:

  1. To have a safe place for both sides to discuss doctrinal differences
  2. To give opportunity for Calvinists to give questions and challenges that have not been answered to their satisfaction from the non-Calvinist camp

I am working on a 5 DVD series that will deal with the Sovereignty of God from the balanced perspective, but dealing primarily with the Calvinist’s proof texts and challenges that Calvinists give to non-Calvinist.  I believe that questions and challenges from Calvinists deserve to be looked at carefully and answered. There will be an opportunity on this blog to ask your questions, to give a challenge and to interact with brothers and sisters who may not agree with you, but who are convinced that we are to be loved as one body in Christ. I will post links to my ministry website when each of the DVDs is ready.

Blessings in Christ,

Cheryl Schatz

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